Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum

 

Program Coordinator – Sharon Shay Sloan, shay@wild.org, with special thanks to Grazia Borrini-Feyerabend of the Indigenous Peoples’ and Community Conserved Territories & Areas (ICCAs) Consortium, and Terry Tanner and Julie Cajune of the Native Lands & Wilderness Council (NLWC).

WILD10 Program Goal  – To advance a vision for the future of conservation—for the protection of all life—inclusive of and rooted in best practices of First Stewards, local communities and mainstream conservation, for the Seven Generations to come. The Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas (ICLS) Forum fosters alliances among Indigenous Peoples (IP), Local Communities (LC), allied organizations and partners, promoting and facilitating intercultural, international dialogue toward a vision for the next 100 years of conservation rooted in the best practices of First Peoples and mainstream conservation, for the Seven Generations to come. Specific WILD10 goals include: increase cooperation among IP, LC’s, allied organizations, governments, individuals and other conservationists toward enhanced care and protection for all life – culture, nature, livelihoods, lands, seas; increase leadership, inclusion and influence of IP/LC on wilderness conservation agendas, goals and outcomes; further mainstream the importance of biocultural knowledge and wisdom, subjective, cultural and spiritual values—and their implications for wild nature; enhance the body of knowledge on IP/LC stewardship of wild lands and seas, worldview and lifeways; support intertribal collaboration and knowledge exchange, including through the Native Lands & Wilderness Council and direct representation in fora, including the Global Intergovernmental Forum on Wilderness (GIFW); promote culturally relevant concepts of and policies regarding “wilderness,” “nature” and “governance.” In partnership with the Nature Strategy for Sustainability (NSS) Coalition, the ICLS Forum aims to establish a global network committed to generating international guidelines, replicable models, and tools for development practices that protect wild nature while meeting basic needs of human health and prosperity.

 

Session Time Key

A is      9:30 AM to 11:10 AM
B is     11:30 AM to 1:10 PM
C is      3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
D is      5:00 PM to 6:30 PM

 

Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum (ICLS) Workshop & Roundtable Series

SUNRISE OPENING BLESSING
Scheduled for: Tuesday, 8-8:45am – Central Plaza inside the Hospederia Building

ICLS-I: Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Communities and the Future of Conservation – Workshop A:  Biocultural Resilience, Culture, Conservation & Communities in the 21st Century
Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session A – Music Room

ICLS-II: Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Communities and the Future of Conservation – Workshop B: “Wilderness” and Nature – Exploring a Cultural Paradox
Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session B – Music Room

ICLS-III: Protecting Sacred Natural Sites, Indigenous Territories, World Heritage Sites and Protected Areas in the Face of Mounting Pressures: Mining, Extractive Industries and Industrial Development – Workshop
[crossover workshop with World Heritage Convention Workshop Series] Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session C – Music Room

ICLS-IV: Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Communities and the Future of Conservation – Workshop C:  “Governing Wilderness?” Why? Who? How?  [Part One] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session A – Music Room

ICLS-V: Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Communities and the Future of Conservation – Workshop D:  “Governing Wilderness?” Why? Who? How?  [Part Two] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Music Room

ICLS-VI: Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Communities and the Future of Conservation – Workshop E:  Native Lands & Wilderness Council Session One – Indigenous Land Managers Engaged in Culturally-Informed Conservation Stewardship of their Ancestral Lands and Waters
Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session C – Music Room

ICLS-VII: Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Communities and the Future of Conservation Workshop F:  Native Lands & Wilderness Council Session Two – Indigenous Land Managers Engaged in Culturally-Informed Conservation Stewardship of their Ancestral Lands and Waters
Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session D – Salon de Pinturas

ICLS-VIII: Nature Rights – Workshop A
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session B – Salon de Pinturas

ICLS-IX: Nature Rights — Workshop B
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session C – Aula 2.3

ICLS-X: Nature Rights — Workshop C
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Thursday, Session B – Salon de Pinturas

ICLS-XI: Nature & Culture Conservation & Resilience across Land & Seascapes – Workshop A
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.7

ICLS-XII: Nature & Culture Conservation & Resilience Across Land & Seascapes – Workshop B
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session D – Music Room

ICLS-XIII: Green Economy & Community Livelihoods – Workshop B
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session C – Aula 2.7

ICLS-XIV: Agriculture, Ranching & Pastoralism For Nature ­­– Workshop A
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session D – Aula 1.2

ICLS-XV: Forestry & Nature Workshop
[crossover workshop with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Music Room

California’s Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative:   A Global Standard For Ocean Wilderness  – Workshop Panel Series

ICLS-XVI: California Ocean Wilderness Workshop – Panel A:  California’s Marine Life Protection Act: The MLPA Statute and the Initiative Process
[crossover workshop with WILD Water] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session A– Aula 2.4

ICLS-XVII: California Ocean Wilderness Workshop – Panel B:  Native American Leadership:  Marine Wilderness Planning and Resulting Changes in Ocean Policy
[crossover workshop with WILD Water] Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.4

ICLS-XVIII:  California Ocean Wilderness Workshop – Panel C:  Lessons Learned and Global Applications: The State of California Marine Protected Area Network
[crossover workshop with WILD Water] Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Sala Menor

ICLS-XIX:  Protecting Sacred Natural Sites, Indigenous Territories, World Heritage Sites and Protected Areas in the Face of Mounting Pressures: Mining, Extractive Industries and Industrial Development – ICLS Roundtable A
[crossover roundtable with World Heritage] Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session D – Music Room

ICLS-XX: Indigenous Peoples, Local Communities & Marine Wilderness –Toward Guidelines and Policy Recommendations – ICLS Roundtable B
[crossover roundtable with WILD Water] Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Music Room

ICLS-XXI: Next steps for the Native Lands & Wilderness Council – ICLS Roundtable C
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session B – Music Room

ICLS-XXII:    Nature Strategy for Sustainability Roundtable – ICLS Roundtable D
[crossover roundtable with Nature Strategy for Sustainability] Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C –Salon de Pinturas

ICLS-XXIII: Next Steps for The Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum – ICLS Roundtable E (Closing Session)
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session D – Music Room

 

 

INDIGENOUS & COMMUNITY LANDS & SEAS – SUNRISE OPENING BLESSING

Scheduled for: Tuesday, 8-8:45am – Central Plaza, Hospederia Building

Gather in a natural setting for a sunrise blessing to welcome participants to the Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum and begin working sessions in a good way.

Hosted by the Native Lands & Wilderness Council and the Indigenous & Community Lands and Seas Forum

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES AND THE FUTURE OF CONSERVATION WORKSHOPS

Objective: To advance a vision for the future of conservation—for the protection of all life—inclusive of and rooted in best practices of First Stewards, local communities and mainstream conservation, for the Seven Generations to come.

ICLS-I:  INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES AND THE FUTURE OF CONSERVATION — WORKSHOP A: “BIOCULTURAL RESILIENCE: CULTURE, CONSERVATION & COMMUNITIES IN THE 21ST CENTURY”

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session A – Music Room

Objective: Enhance cooperation between First Stewards & mainstream conservation; situate current contexts of biocultural resilience in historical context of emergent changes in conservation, including changes in human and environmental rights in the last Century; through constructive dialogue, move toward a vision for the next 100 years of conservation, inclusive of and rooted in best practices of First Stewards, including biocultural knowledge and wisdom, & mainstream conservation, for the Seven Generations to come.

Moderators—Ari Gorring, Kimberly Land Council and Taghi Farvar, Union of Indigenous Nomadic Tribes of Iran (UNINOMAD); Center for Sustainable Development and Environment (CENESTA), ICCA Consortium   

Human Rights/Environmental Rights Continuum – Vision for the Next 100 Years of Conservation and the Seven Generations to Come
Andrea Carmen, International Indian Treaty Council (Yaqui Indian Nation, USA)

Women’s Leadership: Protecting Country, Culture and Community
Irene Davey, Kimberley Land Council (Bardi Jawi; Australia)
Jean O’reeri, Kimberly Land Council (Willinggin Traditional Owner, Australia)

Biocultural Community Protocols: Ecological & Cultural Resilience in the Law
Gino Cocchiaro, Natural Justice, Lawyers for Communities and the Environment; ICCA Consortium (South Africa)

Saving the World on $5,000: Small Grants to Catalyze Community Development in Southeast Asia
Sean Foley & Melody Kemp, The Samdhana Institute (Southeast Asia)

Changing Times: Indigenous Peoples, Knowlede, Wisdom & Climate Change
Johnson Cerda, Conservation International (Kichwa, Ecuador) 

 

NSS-I/ICLS-VIII:  Nature Rights Workshop A

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session B – Salon de Pinturas

Objective: Advance policy and legal approaches to conservation from viewing nature as property (use/access) to legally recognizing the productivity of nature and its existence value as well as human environmental rights to nature’s ecological commons and its life-supporting services. Examine how constitutional and statutorily mandated provisions of government enable such rights to become enforceable by law, and the more immediately replicable legal mechanisms at the community and state/provincial level that prolong the security of nature’s ecological commons.

Moderators – Cormac Cullinan, Green Counsel (NSS); Linda Sheehan, Earth Law Center (NSS), and Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (ICLS)

Harmonizing Human Governance Systems with Nature
Cormac Cullinan, EnAct International/Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature (South Africa)

Achieving Earth-Based Law Through a Rights of Nature Movement
Linda Sheehan, Earth Law Center (United States)

Protecting a Rainforest through Indigenous-Environmentalist Cooperation – Sinkyone Protection of Ancient Redwoods in Northern California
Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (United States)

Nature Rights in Marine Conservation – Ocean Sanctuary and Wilderness Models in the United States
Kaitilin Gaffney, Resources Law Group, LLP (United States)

Nature’s Budget: Challenges and Solutions for a Sustainable Future
Sebastian Winkler, Ecological Footprint Network (United Kingdom)

 

ICLS-II:  INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES AND THE FUTURE OF CONSERVATION WORKSHOP B: “WILDERNESS” AND NATURE – EXPLORING A CULTURAL PARADOX

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session B – Music Room

Objective: Generate a constructive dialogue, inclusive of words, pictures, presence and sounds, on “wilderness” and “nature” among representatives of indigenous peoples and traditional communities and conservationists from various continents.  Explore the paradoxes possibly embedded in the term “wilderness” if and when strictly understood. Find ground for mutual understanding and respectful alliances to defend nature/wilderness from the forces and phenomena that undermine them today.

Co-chairs – Vololona Rasoarimanana, Global Environment Facility Small Grant Program (GEF SGP) Madagascar; ICCA Consortium & Taghi Farvar, Union of Indigenous Nomadic Tribes of Iran (UNINOMAD); Center for Sustainable Development and Environment (CENESTA), ICCA Consortium

“Wilderness” and “Nature”: What do they Mean for Us … ?

Igorot?
Giovanni Reyes
, National Coalition of Indigenous Peoples, Philippines (KASAPI); ICCA Consortium (Igorot, Philippines)

… Shuar Arutam?
Raul Petsain, ICCA Consortium (Shuar, Ecuador)

… Mapuche?
Jorge Nahuel, Confederación Mapuche de Neuquen; ICCA Consortium (Mapuche, Argentina)

… Tla-o-qui-aht First Nations?
Eli Enns ICCA Consortium (Tla-o-qui-aht Frist Nations, Canada)

… Batwa Walikale?
Joseph Itongwa, Coordinator of PIDP-Kivu; Indigenous Peoples of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC); ICCA Consortium (Walikali, Democratic Republic of Congo)

… Kawesqar?
Juan Carlos Tonko, Kawesqar people; ICCA Consortium (Kawesqar, Chile)

… Maya Kit’che?
Felipe Gomez, Oxlajuj Ajpop (Guatemalan National Council of Mayan Spiritual Leaders); ICCA Consortium (K’iche’, Guatemala)

… Traditional Communities in Spain?
Sergio Couto, ICCA Consortium (Spain)

… Tuareg?
Aboubacar Albachir, Association Tunfa; Indigenous Peoples of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC); ICCA Consortium (Tuareg, Niger)

… Tao of Pongso no Tao?
Sutej Hugu , ICCA Consortium (Tao, Taiwan, Province of China)

… Traditional Communities of Madagascar?
Vololona Rasoarimanana, Global Environment Facility Small Grant Program) GEF SGP; ICCA Consortium (Madagascar)

… Shahsavan?
Taghi Farvar, Union of Indigenous Nomadic Tribes of Iran (UNINOMAD); Center for Sustainable Development and Environment (CENESTA); ICCA Consortium (Shahsavan, Iran)

Discussants:   Nigel Dudley, Equilibrium Research (United Kingdom) (TBC), Trevor Sandwith, IUCN (Switzerland), Vance Martin, The WILD Foundation (USA) (TBC), Josep Maria Mallarach, The ICCA Consortium (Spain), Stan Stevens, The ICCA Consortium.

 

WH-I/ICLS-III:  PROTECTING SACRED NATURAL SITES, INDIGENOUS TERRITORIES, WORLD HERITAGE SITES AND PROTECTED AREAS IN THE FACE OF MOUNTING PRESSURES:  MINING, EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT – WORKSHOP

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session C – Music Room

Objective: Panel will assess escalating mining and development threats to sacred natural sites, Indigenous territories, World Heritage Sites and Protected Areas; highlight how incursion of extractives into conservation territories officially protected by multilateral systems is becoming increasingly common, and explore the growing call for No-Go zones; lead discussion on how to effectively halt the incursion of such threats; and prepare for working session to follow, developing strategies and action steps.

Moderators – Liz Hosken, The Gaia Foundation, Nigel Crawhall, IUCN Theme on Indigenous Peoples, Local Communities, Equity and Protected Areas (TILCEPA); Gathuru Mburu, African Biodiversity Network, (Kenya) & Giovanni Reyes, National Coalition of Indigenous Peoples, Philippines (KASAPI); ICCA Consortium (Igorot)

Pygmy Forest Territories and the Impact of Mining Concessions – Perspectives from the Batwa
Joseph Itongwa (Walikali), Coordinator of PIDP-Kivu; Indigenous Peoples of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC); ICCA Consortium (Democratic Republic of Congo)

Facing Mining Initiatives in Tuareg Territories
Aboubacar Albachir (Tuareg), Association Tunfa; Indigenous Peoples of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC); ICCA Consortium (Niger)

Sacred Maya Sites Facing Myriad Destructive “Development” Interventions in Guatemala – Legislation and Other Means of Protection
Felipe Gomez (K’iche’), Oxlajuj Ajpop (Guatemalan National Council of Mayan Spiritual Leaders); ICCA Consortium (Guatemala)

Mining and Indigenous Communities in the Philippines: Impacts and Active Protection
Giovanni Reyes (Igorot), National Coalition of Indigenous Peoples, Philippines (KASAPI); ICCA Consortium, (Philippines)

World Heritage Sites Under Threat – World Heritage Sites & Extractive Industries
Cyril Kormos, The WILD Foundation; International Union for the Conservation of Nature /World Commission on Protected Areas (IUCN/WCPA) (USA)

Maintaining Cultural Integrity of Country in the Face of Large-scale Development Pressure –  Strategies Developed by Kimberley Aboriginal People
Wayne Bergmann, KRED Enterprises (Nykina Mangala, Traditional Owner, Australia)

Lessons from the Far North – Greater Laponia
(TBD)

 

NSS-IX/ICLS-XIV:  Agriculture, Ranching & Pastoralism for Nature – Workshop A

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session D – Aula 1.2

Objective: Communities protecting and regenerating the wild nature in food and fiber production areas.  Building climate change resilience into agriculture.  Avoiding human-wildlife conflict.  Community conservation areas and working landscape strategies for water quality, biodiversity and wildlife corridors.

Co-Moderators—Susan Canney (NSS) and Andrea Carmen (ICLS)

Mali Elephant Project – Fostering Nature Compatible Pastoralism by Utilizing Local Assets to Make    Wildlife Protection an Integral Part of the Local Community
Susan Canney, The WILD Foundation & International Conservation Fund of Canada (United Kingdom)

Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Seed Sovereignty and a Rights Based Approach to Food Supply Sustainability
Andrea Carmen, International Indian Treaty Council (Yaqui Indian Nation; United States)

Nature Benefits of Nomadic Pastoralism – The Iranian Azerbaija
Taghi Farvar, Union of Indigenous Nomadic Tribes of Iran (UNINOMAD); Center for Sustainable Development & Environment (CENESTA); ICCA Consortium (Shahsavan; Iran)

Protecting Cultural Heritage, Water Quality, Biodiversity & Wildlife Corridors within the Pastoral Estate
Peter Murray, Kimberly Land Council (Ngurrara Traditional Owner; Australia)

Community Based Natural Resource Management “Learning by Doing Training Packages” for Protected Areaz and Buffer Zones – Southern African Wildlife College
Sandra Slater-Jones, Southern Africa Wildlife College (South Africa)

 

WH-II/ICLS-XIX:   PROTECTING SACRED NATURAL SITES, INDIGENOUS TERRITORIES, WORLD HERITAGE SITES AND PROTECTED AREAS IN THE FACE OF MOUNTING PRESSURES: MINING, EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT – ROUNDTABLE

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session D – Music Room

Objective – Broaden support for moving beyond position papers and statements, for stronger commitments from governments and the mining and extractives industries to respect and protect categories of Protected Areas, World Heritage Sites, Indigenous territories and sacred natural sites; draft practical strategies and action steps, including a WILD10 Resolution on the protection of indigenous and community lands and seascapes in the face of extractive industries.  (Will feed directly into various streams at World Parks Congress 2014.)

Moderators – Liz Hosken, The Gaia Foundation, Nigel Crawhall, IUCN Theme on Indigenous Peoples, Local Communities, Equity and Protected Areas (TILCEPA); Gathuru Mburu, African Biodiversity Network, (Kenya) & Giovanni Reyes National Coalition of Indigenous Peoples, Philippines (KASAPI); ICCA Consortium (Igorot, Philippines)

Participating Organizations – The Gaia Foundation, African Biodiversity Network, ICCA Consortium, The WILD Foundation, Land is Life, SNSI (Sacred Natural Sites Initiative), TILCEPA (IUCN Theme on Indigenous Peoples, Local Communities, Equity and Protected Areas), CEESP (IUCN Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy), CSVPA (IUCN Specialist Group on Cultural and Spiritual Values of Protected Areas), others.

 

WW-VIII/ICLS-XVI:  California Ocean Wilderness Workshop Panel A – California’s Marine Life Protection Act: The MLPA Statute and the Initiative Process

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session A– Aula 2.4

Objective: Stimulate an in-depth discussion of the State of California’s 1999 MLPA statute and the structure, purpose and goals of the MLPA Initiative to establish regional networks of marine protected areas (MPAs) along 1,770 km of shoreline to help reverse a trend of dwindling fisheries and permanently conserve critical marine and estuarine ecosystems to promote ocean wilderness. Discuss how the MLPA Initiative process—informed by science guidelines, evolving ocean policies, tribal engagement, and robust public participation—produced the only statewide, science-based MPA network in the United States.

Moderator – Kaitilin Gaffney, Ocean and Coastal Program, Resources Law Group, LLP (United States)

Roberta Cordero, Coastal Band of Chumash Nation (United States)
Karen Garrison, Natural Resources Defense Council (United States)
Jim Webb, Cambria Fishing Club  (United States)
Liz Whiteman, California Ocean Science Trust (United States)

ICLS-IV:  INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES AND THE FUTURE OF CONSERVATION WORKSHOP C: “GOVERNING WILDERNESS?” WHY? WHO? HOW? [PART ONE]

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session A – Music Room

Objective: Introduce and discuss the concept of “governance” of protected areas and of nature/wilderness in general and explore how Indigenous peoples and traditional communities understand the idea of governing/ being governed by nature.  The practice of “ecological governance” and “territorial governance” and the concept of ICCAs will be illustrated through case examples, including migration territories, Ancestral Domains and Tribal Parks.  Examples of ICCAs upon which national governments have imposed a protected area status will be examined.  Participants will be engaged to articulate ideas and formulate recommendations to shape Stream VI (Enhancing diversity and quality of governance of protected areas) at the World Parks Congress (Sydney, Nov. 2014).

Moderator – Grazia Borrini-Feyerabend, ICCA Consortium (Switzerland)

Presentations on governance of protected areas and ICCA case examples including:

Tla-o-qui-aht Tribal Parks (Canada)
Shahsavan migration territories (Iran)
The Cordillera del Condor (Ecuador)
Mt. Kalatungan Ancestral Domains (The Philippines)
Khumbu of Mt. Everest (Nepal)
The fokonolona conserved areas (Madagascar)
Mapuche territories (Argentina)
The 48 Cantons of Totonicapan (Guatemala)
Coastal fisheries of Kawesqar people (Chile)
The ICCA Kawawana of Casamance (Senegal)
Walikali territories (Democratic Republic of Congo)
The Banado del Isoso (Bolivia)
ICCAs in different biomes (Spain)

 

WW-IX/ICLS-XVII:  California Ocean Wilderness Workshop Panel B – Native American Leadership:  Marine Wilderness Planning and Resulting Changes in Ocean Policy

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.4

Objective: Address Native American concerns about potential impacts of proposed marine protected area (MPA) regulations to traditional, non-commercial subsistence gathering, harvesting and fishing of marine species, which led to intense engagement from tribes in California’s north coast, home to 26 federally recognized sovereign indigenous nations. Discuss cultural, legal, design, policy, and other elements of Native tribes’ engagement that produced a unique tribally focused MPA regulation, and alliances between Native and non-Native managers working to protect and steward ocean habitats and wildlife.

Moderator – Curtis Berkey, Attorney & Managing PartnerBerkey Williams LLP (United States)

Roberta Cordero, Coastal Band of Chumash Nation (United States)
Briannon Fraley, Smith River Rancheria (United States)
Shawn Padi, Hopland Band of Pomo Indians (United States)
Megan Rocha, Smith River Rancheria (United States)
Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (United States)

 

ICLS-V:  INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES AND THE FUTURE OF CONSERVATION — WORKSHOP C: “GOVERNING WILDERNESS?” WHY? WHO? HOW? [PART TWO]

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Music Room

Objective: Introduce and discuss the concept of “governance” of protected areas and of nature/wilderness in general and explore how indigenous peoples and traditional communities understand the idea of governing/ being governed by nature.  The practice of “ecological governance” and “territorial governance” and the concept of ICCAs will be illustrated through case examples, including migration territories, Ancestral Domains and Tribal Parks.  Examples of ICCAs upon which national governments have imposed a protected area status will be examined.  Participants will be engaged to articulate ideas and formulate recommendations to shape Stream VI (Enhancing diversity and quality of governance of protected areas) at the World Parks Congress (Sydney, Nov. 2014).

Moderator – Grazia Borrini-Feyerabend, ICCA Consortium (Switzerland)

Presentations on governance of protected areas and ICCA case examples including:

Tla-o-qui-aht Tribal Parks (Canada)
Shahsavan migration territories (Iran)
The Cordillera del Condor (Ecuador)
Mt. Kalatungan Ancestral Domains (The Philippines)
Khumbu of Mt. Everest (Nepal)
The fokonolona conserved areas (Madagascar)
Mapuche territories (Argentina)
The 48 Cantons of Totonicapan (Guatemala)
Coastal fisheries of Kawesqar people (Chile)
The ICCA Kawawana of Casamance (Senegal)
Walikali territories (Democratic Republic of Congo)
The Banado del Isoso (Bolivia)
ICCAs in different biomes (Spain)

 

ICLS-XI/NSS-IV:  NATURE & CULTURE CONSERVATION & RESILIENCE ACROSS LAND & SEASCAPES – WORKSHOP A        

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.7

Objective – Collaborative policies and management of formally designated protected areas, easements, zones of limited sustainable use, and working lands, forests, and seas managed with the protection of nature and its services recognized as a mutually dependent, achievable value in tackling challenges to “the commons.”  Indigenous stewardship of nature across territorial land and seascapes, including rights to customary cultural and livelihood uses of natural resources in or around “protected” areas.

Moderators – Ana Beatriz Barona (NSS – TBC) and Melissa George, Indigenous Advisory Committee, Australian Government (ICLS; Wulgurukaba People; Australia)

Community Landholder Commitments to Expanding Protected Natural Areas – Colombian National Protected Areas Trust Fund/Conservation Mosaics Program
Ana Beatriz Barona Colmenares, Fondo Patrimonio Natural (Colombia)

Indigenous Customary Use & Management of Marine & Coastal Ecosystems – An Indigenous Australian Perspective
Melissa George, Indigenous Advisory Committee, Australian Government (Wulgurukaba People; Australia)

Arid Conservation Zones Through Indigenous-Corporate Partnership – Creating the World’s Largest Aridland Conservation Zone
Matt Salmon, The Nature Conservancy (Australia)

Human & Wildlife Security from Terrorist Factions – The Tsavo Trust Model
Ian Saunders, Tsavo Trust (Kenya)

Surface Drinking Water Protected by Wild Forests – Forests-to-Faucets Project
Leanne Marten, U.S. Forest Service (United States)

 

NSS-II/ICLS-IX:  Nature Rights Workshop B

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session C – Aula 2.3

Objective – Advance policy and legal approaches to conservation from viewing nature as property (use/access) to legally recognizing the productivity of nature and its existence value as well as human environmental rights to nature’s ecological commons and its life-supporting services. Examine how constitutional and statutorily mandated provisions of government enable such rights to become enforceable by law, and the more immediately replicable legal mechanisms at the community and state/provincial level that prolong the security of nature’s ecological commons.

Moderators – Linda Sheehan, Earth Law Center (NSS) and Eli Inns, ICCA Consortium (ICLS)

Human-Rights Based Approaches to Conservation
Gina CosentinoThe Nature Conservancy (Canada)

An Inter-Cultural Journey Towards Earth Jurisprudence
Liz HoskenThe Gaia Foundation (United Kingdom) and Gathuru Mburu, Africa Biodiversity Network (Kenya) 

Community Rights to Benefit from Protected Areas and Equitable Revenue Sharing Among Wildlife Conservancy Stakeholders
Teresa NubeMozambican National Directorate of Lands and Forests (Mozambique)

 

NSS-VIII/ICLS-XIII:  Green Nature Economy & Community Livelihoods – Workshop B

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session C – Aula 2.7

Objective: Integrating private and community lands into systems of payments for ecosystem services (PES).  Innovative conservation financing. Models of demand reduction for products extracted by destroying nature.  Conservation livelihoods and enterprise; community conservation areas.

Moderators – Pinky Kondlo, Wilderness Foundation SA (NSS – TBC) and Nolan Hunter, Kimberly Land Council (ICLS)

Nature Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods: Sharing the Wilderness Foundation’s Innovative Nature-Based Models for Generating Employability and Sustaining Livelihoods for South Africa’s Vulnerable Youth [Social Benefits Forum] Andrew Muir & Pinky Kondlo, Wilderness Foundation (South Africa)

Vertical’s Vocational Skills through Outdoor Education Program [Social Benefits Forum] Aldo Boitano, Vertical (Chile)

Conservation Jobs – The Next Generation of Nature Conservationists
Gary Machlis, U.S. National Park Service (United States)

Promoting Good Governance & Improving Community Livelihoods – The Mangalana Community & Sabie Game Park
Moris Chavango, Mukakaza Village (Mangalana Community; Mozambique)

Cultural Economies Based on EcoSystem Services – The Kimberly Region of Australia
Nolan Hunter
, Kimberly Land Council (Bardi Jawi, Australia)

 

ICLS-VI: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES AND THE FUTURE OF CONSERVATION — WORKSHOP D:  NATIVE LANDS & WILDERNESS COUNCIL 1: INDIGENOUS LAND MANAGERS ENGAGED IN CULTURALLY-INFORMED CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP OF THEIR ANCESTRAL LANDS AND WATERS

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session C – Music Room

Objective: Indigenous land managers and activists share their stories of stewardship within the cultural context of their communities. Presenters will enhance understanding and appreciation of Wild Nature and its First Stewards by bringing tribal voices to the mainstream conservation dialogue that reflect millennia of sovereign, indigenous peoples living sustainably and well upon the land and water.

Moderators—Terry Tanner, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) Natural Resources Department, Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness (CSKT, USA) & Julie Cajune, Center for American Indian Policy & Applied Research (CAIPAR) (CSKT, USA)

Presentations & Conversation to include:

Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (USA)
Te Marino Lenihan, Maori (New Zealand)
Gisele Maria Martin, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nations (Canada)
Guy Naehu, Native Hawaiian (USA)
Tashka Yawanawa, Yawanawa People (Brazil)
Shawn Joaquin Padi, Hopland Band of Pomo Indians; InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council  (USA)
Briannon Fraley, Tolowa Dee-ni’ of Smith River Rancheria (USA)
Roberta Cordero, Coastal Band of Chumash Nation (USA)
Kenneth Holbrook, Mountain Maidu Tribe, The Maidu Summit Consortium (USA)
Sage LaPena, Nomtipom, Northern Wintu (USA)
Terry Tanner, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (USA)
Others TBD

 

ICLS-VII: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES AND THE FUTURE OF CONSERVATION — WORKSHOP E:  NATIVE LANDS & WILDERNESS COUNCIL 2 – INDIGENOUS LAND MANAGERS ENGAGED IN CULTURALLY-INFORMED CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP OF THEIR ANCESTRAL LANDS AND WATERS

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session D – Salon de Pinturas

Objective: Indigenous land managers and activists share their stories of stewardship within the cultural context of their communities. Presenters will enhance understanding and appreciation of Wild Nature and its First Stewards by bringing tribal voices to the mainstream conservation dialogue that reflect millennia of sovereign, indigenous peoples living sustainably and well upon the land and water.

Moderators—Terry Tanner, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) Natural Resources Department, Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness (CSKT, USA) & Julie Cajune, Center for American Indian Policy & Applied Research (CAIPAR) (CSKT, USA)

Presentations & Conversation to include:

Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (USA)
Te Marino Lenihan, Maori (New Zealand)
Gisele Maria Martin, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nations (Canada)
Guy Naehu, Native Hawaiian (USA)
Tashka Yawanawa, Yawanawa People (Brazil)
Shawn Joaquin Padi, Hopland Band of Pomo Indians; InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council  (USA)
Briannon Fraley, Tolowa Dee-ni’ of Smith River Rancheria (USA)
Roberta Cordero, Coastal Band of Chumash Nation (USA)
Kenneth Holbrook, Mountain Maidu Tribe, The Maidu Summit Consortium (USA)
Sage LaPena, Nomtipom, Northern Wintu (USA)
Terry Tanner, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (USA)
Others TBD

 

NSS-V/ICLS-XII:   Nature & Culture Conservation & Resilience Across Land & Seascapes Workshop B

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session D – Music Room

Objective: Collaborative policies and management of formally designated protected areas, easements, zones of limited sustainable use, and working lands, forests, and seas managed with the protection of nature and its services recognized as a mutually dependent, achievable value in tackling challenges to “the commons.”  Indigenous stewardship of nature across territorial land and seascapes, including rights to customary cultural and livelihood uses of natural resources in or around “protected” areas.

Moderators – Eli Enns, ICCA Consortium (ICLS) and John Schmerfeld, US Fish & Wildlife Service (NSS)

Species Community Fostered Within Indigenous Watershed Management – Tla-o-qui-aht Tribal Parks; Quay-Qwiik-suup: Landscapes & Lifescapes in Transformation
Eli Enns, ICCA Consortium & Tla-o-qui-aht Tribal Parks (Tla-o-qui-Aht First Nations; Canada)

U.S. Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy:  A Holistic Approach to National Challenges
Joel Holtrop, US Forest Service (United States)

Wilderness & Protected Areas as Climate Change Strategies – North American (NAWPA) Examples
John Schmerfeld, US Fish & Wildlife Service (United States)

Self-Governance of Indigenous Territories as a Model for “Conserved Areas”
Jorge Nahuel, Confederacion Mapuche de Neuquen & ICCA Consortium (Mapuche; Argentina)

Native Land Trusts & Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships for Protecting Ancestral Land Base
Kenneth Holbrook , The Maidu Summit Consortium (Mountain Maidu Tribe; United States)

 

WW-X/ICLS-XVIII:   California Ocean Wilderness Workshop Panel C – Lessons Learned and Global Applications:  The State of California Marine Protected Area Network

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Sala Menor

Objective – Reflect upon critical lessons learned and both current and upcoming steps advancing ocean wilderness stewardship, with emphasis on global applicability of California’s statewide marine protected area (MPA) network as a standard for large-scale ocean planning and conservation. Review critical legislative, administrative, legal, political and other components of the process, along with vital roles of Native American tribal governments and the public. Share thoughts on how science, principles of traditional ecological knowledge, innovative policy approaches, social justice and equity, and other crucial elements can be built into MPA planning and implementation to ensure effective and holistic outcomes.

Moderator—Kaitilin Gaffney, Ocean and Coastal Program, Resources Law Group, LLP (United States)

Briannon Fraley, Smith River Rancheria (United States)
Karen Garrison, Natural Resources Defense Council (United States)
John Laird, State of California Natural Resources Agency (United States)
Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (United States)
Jim Webb, Cambria Fishing Club (United States)

 

NSS-XI/ICLS-XV:  FORESTRY & NATURE WORKSHOP

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Music Room

Objective: Examine how to forge stakeholder agreements between forest owners/users, local indigenous communities whose livelihoods depend on intact forests, business, and regulatory agencies to halt/mitigate deforestation drivers.  The critical need to evolve forest-valuing economies on the frontier of large forests.  Assess best practices in re-wilding a landscape, enhancing the integral ecological value of old growth forests in core protected areas as socio-economic benefits are gained from surrounding areas.

Moderators—Leanne Marten, US Forest Service (NSS) and Dave de Vera, Philippine Association for Intercultural Development (PAFID)/ICCA Consortium (ICLS)

Non-Market Economy – Culture & Nature for Sustainable Livelihoods – Lessons from the Philippines
Dave de Vera, Philippine Association for Intercultural Development (PAFID)/ICCA Consortium (The Philippines)

Forest Carbon Sequestration on Indigenous Lands – Ecuadorian Amazon [TBC] Johnson Cerda, Conservation International (Kichwa, Ecuador)

Engaging With Forestry Companies in Landscape Planning for Nature Protection – Colin Stewart Forest Forum
Raymond Plourde, Ecology Action Centre (Canada)

Multistakeholder Agreements for Culture and Nature Use & Protection – Brazilian Amazon
Tashka Yawanawa, Yawanawa Sociocultural Association (Brazil)

Non-Market Economy – Culture & Nature for Sustainable Livelihoods – Shuar of the Cordillera del Condor
Raul Petsain, ICCA Consortium (Shuar; Ecuador)

 

NSS-III/ICLS-X:  Nature Rights Workshop C

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session B – Salon de Pinturas

Objective – Advance policy and legal approaches to conservation from viewing nature as property (use/access) to legally recognizing the productivity of nature and its existence value as well as human environmental rights to nature’s ecological commons and its life-supporting services. Examine how constitutional and statutorily mandated provisions of government enable such rights to become enforceable by law, and the more immediately replicable legal mechanisms at the community and state/provincial level that prolong the security of nature’s ecological commons.

Moderators—Cormac Cullinan, Green Counsel (NSS) and Taghi Farvar, UNINOMAD/CENESTA/ICCA Consortium (ICLS)

Combating Desertification at a National Level Through a Nature-Rights Approach
Taghi Farvar, Union of Indigenous Nomadic Tribes of Iran (UNINOMAD); Center for Sustainable Development & Environment (CENESTA); ICCA Consortium (Shahsavan; Iran)

Consumptive Rights Over Nature Rights & Anti-Poaching
– Rhinos
Andrew Muir, Wilderness Foundation (South Africa)
– Elephants
Pat Awori, Kenya Wildlife Service [by video – TBC]

Rights in Human-Wildlife Conflict – Wild Peace Solutions
Galeo Saintz, Wild Peace Foundation (South Africa)

Indigenous Animism & Implementation of Nature Rights – Culturally Based Rights of Nature, Pongso no Tao
Sutej Hugu, ICCA Consortium (Tao; Taiwan)

Ecological Justice –Biocultural Rights Emergence and Use
Gino Cocchiaro, Natural Justice; ICCA Consortium (South Africa)

 

ICLS-XXI: NEXT STEPS FOR THE NATIVE LANDS & WILDERNESS COUNCIL – ICLS ROUNDTABLE C

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session B – Music Room

Objective – Participants will discuss Indigenous peoples’ perspectives on “wild nature” within the context of their role as its First Stewards and today’s many environmental, legal, cultural and economic challenges. This outcome-oriented discussion will focus on effective ways in which tribal and Indigenous peoples can more effectively engage with the mainstream conservation movement to bring constructive change through their longstanding practice of living in balance and with respect for all the lifeforms of our sacred earth. Participants will discuss best practices and determine next steps.

Moderators – Terry Tanner, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) Natural Resources Department, Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness (CSKT, USA) & Julie Cajune, Center for American Indian Policy & Applied Research (CAIPAR) (CSKT, USA)

 

NSS-XIII/ICLS-XXII:  NATURE STRATEGY FOR SUSTAINABILITY ROUNDTABLE

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C –Salon de Pinturas

Objectives: Establish ongoing global network committed to generating international guidelines, replicable models, and tools for development practices that protect wild nature while meeting basic needs of human health and prosperity.  Seek to apply principles of Nature Needs Half™ (HALF) – an aspirational and practical vision of sustainability based on the scientific consensus that keeping at least half of wild nature intact and interconnected is vital to ensuring continued life-supporting services to humankind.  Prioritize the protection of nature for its fundamental role in:  alleviated human suffering; enhanced human security; and nature valued in the economy

Moderators – Julie Anton Randall, The WILD Foundation (NSS), Gina Cosentino, The Nature Conservancy (NSS) and Stan Stevens, Indigenous Peoples’ and Community Conserved Territories and Areas Consortium (ICLS)

 

ICLS-XX/WW-XII: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, LOCAL COMMUNITIES & MARINE WILDERNESS –TOWARD GUIDELINES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS – ROUNDTABLE

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Music Room

Moderators—Curtis Berkey, Berkey Williams LLP (USA) & Melissa George, Indigenous Advisory Committee, Australian Government  (Wulgurukaba People; Australia)

Objective: Put forward guidelines and recommendations to the Marine Wilderness Collaborative inclusive of and rooted in best practices of First Stewards and local communities, including biocultural knowledge and wisdom and customary use rights, for the future of Marine Wilderness policy and practice and the Seven Generations to come.

 

ICLS-XXIII:  NEXT STEPS FOR THE INDIGENOUS & COMMUNITY LANDS & SEAS FORUM (CLOSING SESSION) – ROUNDTABLE E

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session D – Music Room

Objective – Further articulate a vision for the future of conservation, inclusive of and rooted in best practices of First Stewards and local communities and mainstream conservation, for the Seven Generations to come. How can Indigenous Peoples, local communities, allied organizations, agencies, governments, individuals and other partners work together toward enhanced protection of all life – culture, nature, livelihoods, lands and seas? Working session to determine best practices, findings to put forward, next steps for the ICLS Forum and participants.

 

CLOSING SESSION: Closing words and blessing.

Moderators – Sharon Shay Sloan, The WILD Foundation (USA), Grazia Borrini-Feyerabend, ICCA Consortium (Switzerland) & Nolan Hunter, Kimberly Land Council (Bardi Jawi; Australia)