WILD Water

 

Program Coordinators – Julie Anton Randall, Julie@wild.org and Austin Perez, Austin.Perez@wild.org

WILD10 Program GoalEstablish a global network committed to marine and freshwater conservation and capable of generating international guidelines, replicable models, and practices that protect and restore wild nature while considering how human needs can be met.  Prioritize the protection of wild nature for its fundamental role in aquatic species survival and reproduction, quantity and quality water for drinking, health, and habitat, the productivity of fisheries, agriculture, and forestry, and recreation and cultural use.  Conduct a one day crossover session with WiLDspeak Conservation Communications Forum where marine scientists and conservation practitioners will join photographers and filmmakers to explore and forge new strategies for working together “on the front lines” of threats to wild nature.

 

Session Time Key

A is      9:30 AM to 11:10 AM
B is     11:30 AM to 1:10 PM
C is      3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
D is      5:00 PM to 6:30 PM

 

WILD Water (WW) Workshop & Roundtable Series

WW-I: Marine Wilderness Collaborative Workshop A – Training in Marine Wilderness Definition & Management
Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session C – Salon de Pinturas

WW-II: Marine Wilderness Collaborative Workshop B – Ranking Priority Coral Reefs
Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session D – Salon de Pinturas 

WW-III:  Marine Wilderness Collaborative Workshop C – Ranking Priority Wildlife Habitat
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Salon de Pinturas

WW-IV: Marine Wilderness in Practice Workshop A – Land & Seascape Strategies
Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.7

WW-V: Marine Wilderness in Practice Workshop B – Recovering Fisheries
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session B – Sala Menor

WW-VI: Marine Wilderness in Practice Workshop C – Mitigating Disturbances Of Noise, Debris & Pollution
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C– Aula 2.3 

WW-VII:  Marine Wilderness in Policy Workshop – Setting Targets For Wild Marine Protection
Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session B – Aula 2.4 

California’s Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative:   A Global Standard For Ocean Wilderness  – Workshop Panel Series 

WW-VIII: California Ocean Wilderness Workshop – Panel A:  California’s Marine Life Protection Act: The MLPA Statute and the Initiative Process
[crossover With Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum]
Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session A– Aula 2.4

WW-IX: California Ocean Wilderness Workshop – Panel B:  Native American Leadership:  Marine Wilderness Planning and Resulting Changes in Ocean Policy
[crossover With Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum]
Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.4

WW-X: California Ocean Wilderness Workshop – Panel C:  Lessons Learned and Global Applications:  The State of California Marine Protected Area Network Model
[crossover With Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum]
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Sala Menor 

WW-XI: Economy of Marine Wilderness Workshop
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Aula 2.5

WW-XII: Indigenous Peoples, Local Communities & Marine Wilderness Roundtable – Toward Guidelines and Policy Recommendations
[crossover with Indigenous & Community Lands & Seas Forum]
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Music Room

WW-XIII: Marine Wilderness Collaborative Roundtable
Scheduled for: Thursdsay, Session D – Salon de Pinturas

WW-XIV: Marine Wilderness Collaborative/Images for Citizen Activism
[crossover with WiLDspeak and Citizen Activism]
Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Juan del Enzina Theater

 

 


WW-VII:  MARINE WILDERNESS IN POLICY WORKSHOP – SETTING TARGETS FOR WILD MARINE PROTECTION

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session B – Aula 2.4

Objective: Overview existing policy and marine protected area (MPA) and MPA network strategies and methods of raising policymaker awareness of action on and the need for enforcement.  Set the stage for the opening Marine Wilderness Collaborative (WW-I) session to follow.

Moderator – Doug Yurick, Parks Canada and Nancy Roeper, US Fish & Wildlife Service

Reaching Convention on Biological Diversity Goals in the Mediterranean Protected Areas Network (MedPAN)
Puri Canals, MedPAN, with photos by Iñaki Relanzon, iLCP Photographer

Monitoring & Enforcement of Marine Wilderness Areas – Use of New Technologies
Mark J. Spalding, The Ocean Foundation (USA)

Marine Natura 2000 Network – LIFE & INDEMARES Project
Ignacio Torres, Fundacion Biodiversidad (Spain)

Empathy for Our Planet: An Underwater Video Conference
David Novillo, Oceano Sostenible (Spain)

Innovative Information Technologies to address Ocean Governance – Future Ocean Alliance
Isabel Torres de Noronha, Future Ocean Alliance (Portugal)


WW-I: MARINE WILDERNESS COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP A – TRAINING IN MARINE WILDERNESS DEFINITION & MANAGEMENT

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session C – Salon de Pinturas

Objective: Expand the Marine Wilderness Collaborative (MWC) launched at WILD9.  Work toward international consensus marine wilderness definition and management objectives.  Plan for the identification of candidate sites and zones for marine wilderness management.

Moderator – Jim Kurth, US Fish & Wildlife Service and Julie Anton Randall, The WILD Foundation and

Opening Remarks
J
im Kurth, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (United States)

Introduction of Her Deepness, Dr. Sylvia Earle
Vance Martin, The WILD Foundation (United States)

Marine Wilderness Collaborative & Marine Wilderness Project Overview
Julie Anton Randall and Austin Perez, The WILD Foundation (USA)

Toward an International Definition & Management Objectives – NAWPA Conserving Marine Wilderness Vision
Nancy Roeper, US Fish & Wildlife Service (USA) and Doug Yurick, Parks Canada (Canada)

    • Marine wilderness characteristics
    • Questions of size
    • Developing a basic MPA toolkit for marine wilderness – introduction of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Sanctuaries Program management toolkit components for adaptation

Human Use Implications:  Indigenous Connection, Custodianship & Responsibility for Seascape Management & Repopulating the Wild
Melissa George, Wulgurukaba People (Australia)

Human Use Implications:  Recreational Marine & Freshwater Fishing
John Zablocki, Trout Unlimited (USA)

Human Use Implications:  Surfing and Conservation of the Coast – Southern California and Mexico
Serge Dedina, WILDCOAST (USA)

Applying Marine Spatial Science – Example of “The Last Wild Ocean Laboratory” of The Ross Sea in Antarctica
John Weller, The Last Ocean (USA) [video]

WW-II:  MARINE WILDERNESS COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP B – RANKING PRIORITY CORAL REEFS

Scheduled for: Tuesday, Session D – Salon de Pinturas

Objective: Build professional capacity to apply marine wilderness as a conservation mechanism utilizing baseline criteria for assessing lost and remaining reefs and associated local human threats to survival and recovery.  Identify causes of coral loss, including acidification, and what mitigation is both necessary and possible.  Consider recreation, tourism, fishing and boating guidelines to protect corals.

Moderator—Ian Drysdale, Healthy Reefs Initiative [invited - TBC]

Reef Management Through Health Report Cards and Eco-Audits in the Mesoamerican Reef
Ian Drysdale, Healthy Reefs for Healthy People Initiative, Smithsonian Institute (USA)

Application of Science to Management – Global Reef Expedition
Alison Barrat, Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (USA)

Conservation of Corals and Sponge Aggregations as Essential Fish Habitats and as a Measure to Contribute to Sustainable Fisheries
Xavier Pastor, OCEANA (Spain)

Reefs of Cabo Pulmo
Fay Crevoshay, WILDCOAST (USA/Mexico)

WILD WATER-WILDSPEAK CROSSOVER

Reefs of Cabo Pulmo
Fay Crevoshay, WILDCOAST (Mexico/USA) – and Octavio Aburto, iLCP Photographer (Mexico)

Danajon Bank
Thomas Peschak and Luciano Candisani, iLCP Photographers – and Miriam Turner, Net-Works Program of Interface (United Kingdom)

The MesoAmerican Reef
Shari Sant Plummer, Code Blue Foundation (USA); Sylvia Earle, Mission Blue (USA); Kathy Moran, National Geographic Society (USA); Alexandra García, Cristina Mittermeier and Miguel Ángel de la Cueva, iLCP (USA and Mexico); Ian Drysdale, Healthy Reefs for Healthy People Initiative, Smithsonian Institute (USA) [TBC]

WW-VIII/ICLS-XVI:  California Ocean Wilderness Workshop Panel A – California’s Marine Life Protection Act: The MLPA Statute and the Initiative Process

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session A– Aula 2.4 

Objective: Stimulate an in-depth discussion of the State of California’s 1999 MLPA statute and the structure, purpose and goals of the MLPA Initiative to establish regional networks of marine protected areas (MPAs) along 1,770 km of shoreline to help reverse a trend of dwindling fisheries and permanently conserve critical marine and estuarine ecosystems to promote ocean wilderness. Discuss how the MLPA Initiative process—informed by science guidelines, evolving ocean policies, tribal engagement, and robust public participation—produced the only statewide, science-based MPA network in the United States.

Moderator – Kaitilin Gaffney, Ocean and Coastal Program, Resources Law Group, LLP (United States)

Roberta Cordero, Coastal Band of Chumash Nation (United States)
Karen Garrison, Natural Resources Defense Council (United States)
Jim Webb, Cambria Fishing Club  (United States)
Liz Whiteman, California Ocean Science Trust (United States)

 

WW-IV/NSS-IV/ICLS-XI:  marine wilderness in practice Workshop A – land & seascape strategies

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.7

Objective : Collaborative policies and management of formally designated protected areas, easements, zones of limited sustainable use, and working lands, forests, and seas managed with the protection of nature and its services recognized as a mutually dependent, achievable value in tackling challenges to “the commons.”  Indigenous stewardship of nature across territorial land and seascapes, including rights to customary cultural and livelihood uses of natural resources in or around “protected” areas.

Moderators – Ana Beatriz Barona Colmenares, Fondo Patrimonio Natural (NSS – Invited) and Melissa George, Indigenous Advisory Committee to Australian Government (ICLS)

Community Landholder Commitments to Expanding Protected Natural Areas –Colombian National Protected Areas Trust Fund/Conservation Mosaics Program
Ana Beatriz Barona Colmenares, Fondo Patrimonio Natural (Colombia)

Indigenous Customary Use & Management of Marine & Coastal Ecosystems – An Indigenous Australia Perspective
Melissa George, Indigenous Advisory Committee, Australian Government (Wulgurukaba People; Australia)

Creating the World’s Largest Aridlands Conservation Zone Through Indigenous Partnerships
Matt Salmon, The Nature Conservancy (Australia) 

Human & Wildlife Security from Terrorist Factions – The Tsavo Trust Model
Ian Saunders, Tsavo Trust (Kenya)

Surface Drinking Water Protected by Wild Forests – Forests-to-Faucets Project
Leanne Marten, U.S. Forest Service (United States)

  

WILD WATER-WILDSPEAK CROSSOVER

Bristol Bay
Robert Glenn Ketchum, iLCP Photographer

S.O.S. Spanish Coastline
Jose Benito Ruiz, iLCP and AEFONA
(Spain)

 

WW-IX/ICLS-XVII:  California Ocean Wilderness Workshop Panel B – Native American Leadership:  Marine Wilderness Planning and Resulting Changes in Ocean Policy 

Scheduled for: Wednesday, Session B – Aula 2.4 

Objective: Address Native American concerns about potential impacts of proposed marine protected area (MPA) regulations to traditional, non-commercial subsistence gathering, harvesting and fishing of marine species, which led to intense engagement from tribes in California’s north coast, home to 26 federally recognized sovereign indigenous nations. Discuss cultural, legal, design, policy, and other elements of Native tribes’ engagement that produced a unique tribally focused MPA regulation, and alliances between Native and non-Native managers working to protect and steward ocean habitats and wildlife.

Moderator – Curtis Berkey, Attorney & Managing PartnerBerkey Williams LLP (United States)

Roberta Cordero, Coastal Band of Chumash Nation (United States)
Briannon Fraley, Smith River Rancheria (United States)
Shawn Padi, Hopland Band of Pomo Indians (United States)
Megan Rocha, Smith River Rancheria (United States)
Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (United States)

 

WW-X/ICLS-XVIII:  California Ocean Wilderness Workshop Panel C – Lessons Learned and Global Applications:  The State of California Marine Protected Area Network Model

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Sala Menor

Objective – Reflect upon critical lessons learned and both current and upcoming steps advancing ocean wilderness stewardship, with emphasis on global applicability of California’s statewide marine protected area (MPA) network as a standard for large-scale ocean planning and conservation. Review critical legislative, administrative, legal, political and other components of the process, along with vital roles of Native American tribal governments and the public. Share thoughts on how science, principles of traditional ecological knowledge, innovative policy approaches, social justice and equity, and other crucial elements can be built into MPA planning and implementation to ensure effective and holistic outcomes.

Moderator—Kaitilin Gaffney, Ocean and Coastal Program, Resources Law Group, LLP (United States)

Briannon Fraley, Smith River Rancheria (United States)
Karen Garrison, Natural Resources Defense Council (United States)
John Laird, State of California Natural Resources Agency (United States)
Hawk Rosales, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (United States)
Jim Webb, Cambria Fishing Club (United States)

WW-III:  MARINE WILDERNESS COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP C – RANKING PRIORITY WILDLIFE HABITAT

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session A – Salon de Pinturas 

Objective – Build professional capacity to apply marine wilderness as a conservation mechanism utilizing baseline criteria for ranking priority habitat – mating, spawning, nursery and migration route areas for fish, marine mammals and other species.  Consider recreation, tourism, fishing and boating guidelines to protect wildlife habitat.  Use species’ cases to illustrate the critical connection between conservation on coastal lands, reefs, and open seas, and cases of migratory animals crossing national borders across “the commons” to build professional capacity with tools illustrating how sources of depletion in one jurisdiction impacts another; specific risks of trophic downgrading.

Moderator—Linda Sheehan, Earth Law Center [invited – TBC]

Whales & Dolphins
Linda Sheehan, Earth Law Center (USA)

Seals & Orcas of Antarctica
John Weller, The Last Ocean (USA) [video]

Sea Birds
Enriqueta Velarde, Institute of Marine Science & Fisheries, University of Vera Cruz (Mexico)

Sea Turtles: A Conservation Mosaic
Jesus “Chuy” Lucero, Grupo Tortuguero (Mexico)

Transboundary Marine Species – Western Hemisphere Migratory Species Initiative|
Mark J. Spalding, WHMSI Marine Mammals Committee Chair and The Ocean Foundation (USA)

 

WILD WATER-WILDSPEAK CROSSOVER

Sharks
Thomas Peschak, iLCP Photographer

Tortuga Rising
Neil E. Osborne, iLCP (Canada) and Jesus “Chuy” Lucero, Grupo Tortuguero (Mexico)

 

WW-V:  MARINE WILDERNESS IN PRACTICE WORKSHOP B – RECOVERING FISHERIES

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session B – Sala Menor

Objective: Mapping areas most in need of fish stocks intervention and recovery.  Using market participants to achieve sustainable fish yields, leaving critical mating, spawning and juvenile habitat intact to prevent a crash.  Implications of illegal, unregulated, and unreported  (IUU) fishing.

Moderator— [TBD]

Fish Regeneration Using Marine Wilderness – Gulf of California
Dr. Exequiel Ezcurra, University of California Riverside (USA)

The Mediterranean & Bluefin Tuna – Monaco Blue [TBC]
Patrick Van Klaverern, Prince Albert of Monaco II Foundation (Monaco) [TBC]

Predatory Fish Protection through Marine Wilderness Management of the Ross Sea
John Weller, The Last Ocean (USA/Antarctica) [video]

Restoring Anadromous Fisheries Through Dam Removal: Elwah and Klamath Rivers
John Duffield, University of Montana (USA)

Multistakeholder Monitoring of Salmonid Fisheries Habitat – Stream Team Creek Restoration
Shawn Padi, Hopland Band of Pomo Indians, InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council (USA)

 

WILD WATER-WILDSPEAK CROSSOVER

Mexican Seas
Octavio Aburto, iLCP Photographer (Mexico)

Changing Unsustainable Lobster Fishing Off the Honduras Coast – Visual Messaging Targeted at Local Fishermen
Miguel Angel del la Cueva and Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier, iLCP Photographers


WW-VI: MARINE WILDERNESS IN PRACTICE WORKSHOP C – MITIGATING DISTURBANCES OF NOISE, DEBRIS & POLLUTION

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C– Aula 2.3

Objective – Status, impacts, and what can be done about marine debris (trash pollution from ships, fishing gear, on-land sources, other) and its most harmful effects (such as ingestion and entanglement) and the species/habitats most impacted and how, developing outreach toolkit ideas and strategies involving fishermen and recreationists.

Moderator—Mark J. Spalding, The Ocean Foundation

Understanding and Mitigating Ocean Noise Pollution, Ship Traffic, and Other Vessel Disturbances
Mark J. Spalding
, The Ocean Foundation (USA)

Threats to Marine Wildlife from Marine Debris – Albatross on Pacific Islands
Nancy Roeper, US Fish & Wildlife Service (USA)

Introduction of NOAA Marine Debris Program Resources
Austin Perez, The WILD Foundation (USA)

Marine Litter: A valuable Resource that can be recovered together with the Fishermen
Bernard Merkx, Waste-Free Oceans (Belgium)

Fishing Gear Recycling
Mr Hans Axel Kristensen, CEO of Plastix.

Best practices for reducing marine litter and promote co-responsibility and social awareness: the MARLISCO experience
Mrs Demetra Orthodoxou, ISOTECH  Ltd.

 

WILD WATER-WILDSPEAK CROSSOVER

Lake Baikal – Under the Ice
Olga Kamenskaya and Dmitry Melamed (Russia)

Marine Debris of Fukushima
Gianni Giouse, Freelance photographer (Italy)

 

WW-XI: ECONOMY OF MARINE WILDERNESS WORKSHOP

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Aula 2.5

Objective – Using market participants to achieve sustainable yields of commercially-targeted fish, leaving critical fish mating, spawning and juvenile habitat intact to prevent a crash.  Implications of illegal, unregulated, and unreported (IUU) fishing.  Value and limitations of eco-labeling.  Ecotourism for the protection of wild marine environments.

Moderator – [TBD]

Sustainable Financing Mechanisms for Marine Protected Areas
Ana Beatriz Barona Colmenares, Fondo Patrimonio Natural (Colombia)

Coastal Marine Wilderness Benefits of Business Partnerships – LIFE & INDEMARES Project
Ignacio Torres, Fundacion Biodiversidad (Spain)

Marine and Coastal Indigenous Community Conservation Areas – Biocultural Diversity, Sustainable Livelihoods & Community Empowerment
Grazia Borrini-Feyerabend, Indigenous Peoples’ and Community Conserved Territories and Areas Forum (Switzerland)

Tourism Destinations as Marine Conservation – International Conservation Corp/Global Parks Methods for Grand Bahamas Island
Joel Holtrop, Global Parks (USA)

Balancing Development Concessions & Coastal Ecosystem Protection – Mexican Coastal Wildlands
Eduardo Najera, WILDCOAST (Mexico)

 

WW-XII/ ICLS-XX: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, LOCAL COMMUNITIES & MARINE WILDERNESS –TOWARD GUIDELINES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Music Room

Objective: Put forward guidelines and recommendations to the Marine Wilderness Collaborative inclusive of and rooted in best practices of First Stewards and local communities, including biocultural knowledge and wisdom and customary use rights, for the future of Marine Wilderness policy and practice and the Seven Generations to come.

Moderators—Curtis Berkey, Berkey Williams LLP (USA) & Melissa George, Indigenous Advisory Committee, Australian Government  (Wulgurukaba People; Australia)

 

WW-XIV/ WiLDspeak/CAW-III – IMAGES FOR CITIZEN ACTIVISM

[Crossover content taking place in WiLDspeak on Thursday]

Scheduled for: Thursday, Session C – Juan del Enzina Theater

Objectives: Catalog strategies and tools (including photography, film and journalism) of partners to communicate the severity of ocean degradation and what needs to be done, and use it as an adaptable toolkit for reaching primary targets for activism:  local communities; policy-makers/influencers; educators; extractive industries; tourism sector; and recreationists, including sportsfishermen.

 

In WiLDspeak, 10 October at 3:00 PM:

The Value of the Planet in Minutes – Natural Numbers
Jaime Rojo, iLCP Photographer (Mexico), Exequiel Ezcurra, University of California Riverside (USA), and Octavio Aburto, iLCP Photographer (Mexico)

Portable Devices for Indigenous Community Awareness & Advocacy through Film
Alison Barrat, The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation

Visual Assessment Tools – S.O.S. Spanish Coastline
Jose Benito Ruiz, iLCP Photographer (Spain)


WW-XIII:  MARINE WILDERNESS COLLABORATIVE ROUNDTABLE

Scheduled for: Thursdsay, Session D – Salon de Pinturas

Objective – Plan next steps for the Marine Wilderness Collaborative internationally.  Agreeing upon and customizing the marine wilderness definition and management objectives to advance marine wilderness management areas and zones around the world.

Moderators – Jim Kurth, US Fish & Wildlife Service and Julie Anton Randall, The WILD Foundation

Keynote Presentation – Marine Wilderness & Bringing Back the Wild in Our Oceans
Dr. Sylvia Earle, Mission Blue

Be Sociable, Share!